Friday, 15 March 2030

GENERAL NOTE – 2021

Readings continue to be held online at the usual time (Thu, 7 p.m.). Updates about the group's progress are given on this site (s. below). 

New readers are always welcome. Fritz Senn's group is open to beginners as well as returners at any stage. If you'd like to join the online readings, please contact the Zurich Foundation to ask for access: info@joycefoundation.ch

Sunday, 11 April 2021

Thursday, 8 April 2021 (18.16)

The last reading stopped at: “thing mud.” (18.16)

A couple of favourites were:

1



2




With thanks to A.


Gut aftermeal! See you doomed. (17.16)

litters from aloft (17.28)


 

Saturday, 3 April 2021

Thursday, 1 April 2021 (16.35)

The last reading stopped at: “one dabblin bar.” (16.35) 

One favourite was:




With thanks to A.


Here have sylvan coyne (16.30)


Sunday, 28 March 2021

Thursday, 25 March 2021 (15.15)


Easter 2021: The reading will continue over Easter. The group is convening as usual on April 1, Maundy Thursday (Gr├╝ndonnerstag).

The last reading stopped at: “pollyfool fiansees.” (15.15) 







With thanks, as always, to A.

Sunday, 21 March 2021

Thursday, 18 March 2021 (13.28)

The last reading stopped at: “(Succoth)” (13.28) 

One favourite was:



With thanks to A. for the update.


And so. And all. (Succoth.) (13.28)


Sunday, 14 March 2021

Thursday, 11 March 2021 (12.17)

The last reading stopped at: “cocked by a hin.” (12.17) 

Some favourites were:

1

“there'll be iggs for the brekkers come to mournhim, sunny side up with care.” (12.14)

2


3

“to steal our historic presents from the past postpropheticals” (11.30)

The following illustrations show the way in which people living in 1900 imagined the year 2000 to be. Seen from today's point of view, we may be looking at some “past postpropheticals”:

The rural postman


Weather control machine


Video phone


School


Sticks of glowing radium for your fireplace



Find more images on Paleo-Future.


With thanks to A.


Saturday, 6 March 2021

Friday, 26 February 2021

Thursday, 25 February 2021 (9.36)

The last reading stopped at: “Dalaveras fimmieras!” (9.36)

One favourite passage was:



With thanks to A.


“Voutre.” (9.14)

Saturday, 20 February 2021

Thursday, 18 February 2021 (9.9)

The last reading stopped at: “git the band up.” (9.9)

One favourite passage was:



With thanks to A.


Assaye, assaye! (8.26)


Sunday, 14 February 2021

Thursday, 11 February 2021 (7.25)

The last reading stopped at: “pinnyweight” (7.25)

One favourite passage was:



the brontoichthyan form outlined aslumbered (7.20)


Sunday, 7 February 2021

Thursday, 4 February 2021 (6.28)

The last reading stopped at: “fuddled, O!” (6.28)




You'll be doing this at your own risk but, if you're not afraid of being stuck with yet another earworm for a good while, c
lick here, or on the musical notes below, to listen to a rendering of the song “Phil the Fluter's Ball” by Ronnie Dew:




With thanks to A. for the update.



Friday, 29 January 2021

Thursday, 28 January 2021 (5.24)

The last reading stopped at: “flyday” (5.24)

One favourite passage was:



Comeday morm ... (5.19)

Saturday, 23 January 2021

Thursday, 21 January 2021 (4.17)

The group has just started a new round of Finnegans Wake. It stopped the reading at: “phoenish.” (4.17)

A couple of favourite passages were:

1



2



With thanks to A. for the update.



the regginbrow (3.14)

the pftjschute of Finnegan (3.19)


Sunday, 17 January 2021

Thursday, 14 January 2021 (“a long the”)


The reading group at the Zurich James Joyce Foundation has just completed its third round of Finnegans Wake. It is starting a new round of the book right away on Thursday, 21 January 2021.

The Thursday Wake readings with Fritz Senn began in 1986 and are open to anybody curious enough to want to give the book a try.

To give ALP the last word for the time being, click here to see a PDF of the list below.




Sunday, 10 January 2021

Thursday, 7 January 2021 (627.21)

The last reading stopped at: “letting on to meself always.” (627.21)

One favourite passage was:



This blog never tries to explain Joyce's text, but merely to illustrate some of its passages. It is breaking with tradition, then, to add the following, but the Edwardian ad may be worth doing so:

John Gordon notes that, in Joyce's time, “belladonna juice was a cosmetic for dilating the pupils and enhancing the eyes. Both women and men used it when they wanted to make an effect” (John Gordon's Finnegans Wake Blog).


Found on: https://my-ear-trumpet.tumblr.com/page/10


Saturday, 19 December 2020

Thursday, 17 December 2020 (626.13)

The last reading stopped at: “Scieoula!” (626.13)

We are taking a break over holidays. The next reading will take place on Thursday, 7 January 2021.

One favourite passage was:




With thanks to A.


Why, them's the muchrooms, come up during the night. (625.19)


Friday, 11 December 2020

Thursday, 10 December 2020 (625.13)

The last reading stopped at: Finglas since the Flood.” (625.13) 

One favourite passage was:



With thanks to A., as always.

Sunday, 6 December 2020

Thursday, 3 December 2020 (624.10)

The last reading stopped at: “where the sterres be.” (624.10)



With thanks to A. for the update. 

Monday, 30 November 2020

Thursday, 26 November 2020 (623.20)

The last reading stopped at: “He's reading his ruffs.” (623.20) 

Among the favourite passages was the line below. 

We're leaving it to the reader to decide which of the visual renderings is to be favoured. Feel free to leave an anonymous comment.






With thanks to A. for the update.

Sunday, 22 November 2020

Thursday, 19 November 2020 (622.24)

The last reading stopped at: “to ball you out.” (622.24)

One favourite was:



With thanks to A. for all the updates


Sunday, 15 November 2020

Saturday, 7 November 2020

Sunday, 1 November 2020

Friday, 23 October 2020

Thursday, 22 October 2020 (618.24)

The last reading stopped at: “opennine knighters” (618.24)

One favourite was:



The cad with the pope's wife (618.4)


Sunday, 18 October 2020

Thursday, 15 October 2020 (617.19)

The last reading stopped at: “uttering foon!” (617.19)

One favourite was:


 

Sunday, 11 October 2020

Saturday, 3 October 2020

Thursday, 1 October 2020 (615.24)

 

The last reading stopped at: “a pulltomine” (615.24).

One favourite was:




Sunday, 27 September 2020

Thursday, 24 September 2020 (614.22)

 

The last reading stopped at: “Forget, remember!” (614.22)

This comparatively dense passage contains a great number of potential favourites. Here's one that is at least easy to visualize:




Monday, 21 September 2020

Saturday, 12 September 2020

Thursday, 10 September 2020 (612.21)

 

The last reading stopped mid-sentance at: “ruinboon pot before” (612.21)



Sunday, 6 September 2020

Sunday, 30 August 2020

Tuesday, 25 August 2020

Thursday, 20 August 2020 (608.32)


The last reading stopped at: “the Phoenican wakes.” (608.32) 

One modest favourite was:


As well as a more ambitious passage:

Signs are on of a mere by token that wills still to be becoming upon this there once a here was world. (608.26)



Sunday, 16 August 2020

Thursday, 13 August 2020 (607.16)

 

The last reading stopped at: “lovesoftfun at Finnegan's Wake.” (607.16)


Some famourites were:

1



2




Nuotabene. (606.13)

O ferax cupla! (606.23)



Sunday, 9 August 2020

Thursday, 6 August 2020 (606.12)

 

The last reading stopped at: “Yee.” (606.12)

Favourite passages were Kevin's

 

   his ...

                  ... altar super bath (605.14) ...

 

                                ... bath propter altar (605.21) ...

 

                     ... altar unacumque bath (605.32) ...

 

    ... his tubbathaltar (606.2) ...

 

                                        ... that handbathtub (606.7)


2

3



Saturday, 1 August 2020

Sunday, 26 July 2020

Thursday, 23 July 2020 (603.23)


The last reading stopped at: “a citting.” (603.23)

One favourite was, perhaps not surprisingly these days:






you in a guessmasque, latterman! (603.3)





Sunday, 19 July 2020

Sunday, 12 July 2020

Thursday, 9 July 2020 (601.13)


The last reading stopped at: “a clanagirls.” (601.13)

One favourite was:






Homos Circas Elochlannensis! (600.29)


Sunday, 5 July 2020

Thursday, 2 July 2020 (600.14)


The last reading stopped at: “Goodspeed the blow!” (600.14)

One favourite place was:




Father Times and Mother Spacies (600.2)






Sunday, 28 June 2020

Saturday, 20 June 2020

Thursday, 18 June 2020 (598.9)


The last reading stopped at: “Diu!” (598.9)

The passage that was covered reads well and contains a number of amusing places. To pick just one favourite:




You hald him by the tap of the tang. (598.3)


Saturday, 13 June 2020

Sunday, 7 June 2020

Thursday, 4 June 2020 (596.15)


The last reading stopped at: “fert in fort;” (596.15)

A favourite was:




Thus faraclacks the friarbird. (595.33)


Saturday, 30 May 2020

Sunday, 24 May 2020

Thursday, 21 May 2020 (594.5)


The group has now started Book IV, opening with calls to wake up. The reading stopped at: “theeadjure” (594).





Quake up, dim dusky (593.14)




Sunday, 17 May 2020

Thursday, 14 May 2020 (590.12)

The last reading stopped at: Praypaid my promishles!” (590.12)

Some favourite passages were:

1

2

3
For those interested in Joyce’s theatre company The English Players, “fancy, they were free! (588.36) may carry overtones of a play they performed in Zurich in 1919.

 

 

Advertisement in the Tagblatt der Stadt Z├╝rich (1919), 8 December

Fancy Free is a one-act comedy by Stanley Houghton, amusingly wicked, mildly provocative but light-hearted (publ. c. 1912):


Fancy, a married woman, has run away with her lover, Alfred. The opening of the play finds her writing to her husband, Ethelbert, from a hotel to tell him she has left him forever. To the couple’s great surprise, they run into the husband, who has himself run away with his lover Delia and is staying in the same hotel. None of the four seem too perturbed, however, and start to discuss their situation and one another’s shortcomings. Finally, Fancy pairs off with her husband again and Delia starts to attract Alfred's interest. The play closes with Delia’s words to Ethelbert “Do you know, you've got the most delightfully wicked eyes”.

 

To see more about The English Players’ performances in Zurich, find an essay here.

 

 


misflooded his fortunes (589.27)

the grand tryomphal arch (590.9)

fancy, they were free! (588.36)